If you find any broken links on topically related websites, you can immediately contact the website owner and inform him about it. Since you will do him a favor by pointing out a broken link, you can also kindly request a replacement with a link to your relevant resource. Of course, the replacement – your article – must be informative and useful for their audience.
The scientific literature is a place where link persistence is crucial to the public knowledge. A 2013 study in BMC Bioinformatics analyzed 15,000 links in abstracts from Thomson Reuters’ Web of Science citation index, founding that the median lifespan of Web pages was 9.3 years, and just 62% were archived.[10] The median lifespan of a Web page constitutes high-degree variable, but its order of magnitude usually is of some months.[11]
I have two tabs open. This article and another one. Both written in June. Each with a different opinion on keywords in URLs. Its so hard to follow SEO nowadays when everyone says they have the best data to prove stuff yet contradict each other. The only way around it is to test test test on my own stuff but it would be great if there was concensus.
Organic results includes a wider range of websites—not just local businesses. While location may still be a factor in the organic results, it is not generally the dominant factor. The main factor is the authority of the website (or the credibility of the site), external links back to the site, the length of time the site has been live, and other considerations. This is why you will often see sites such as Yelp, Angie’s List, and Facebook show up high in search results.
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